Friday, April 7

History Post: About The New York Society Library

A Little About The Oldest
Library in New York City, 
the New York Society Library... 
the New York Society Library
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY 10075
212/288-6900
Photo via: Beth Perkins. Courtesy of the New York Society Library

I have walked passed this beautiful Italianate town house for years on my walk home from work, and since it's in my neighborhood on the Upper East Side I find myself often peering into this historic home on 79th street and Madison Avenue.  To me, the library seems to channel the lifestyle of Old New York, and I wonder if perhaps when Edith Wharton was writing her novels she spent time here?  I also hear they have a wide selection of art, and an extensive collection one of my favorite historic artist's, John Audubon.

Opened in 1754, it is the city's oldest library and it was originally called, "the City Library" since it served as NYC's primary source for books for 100 years before the public library system was created in 1895.  Today, the library is home to a collaborative community of avid writers and readers. With almost 300,000 volumes in fiction, literature, biography, history, social sciences, the arts, and travel the library puts a special focus on books with a historical look at New York City.

Art lines the walls of this beautiful library.  Membership is not too steep in price, or even selective, one simply needs to pay and sign up.  In order to check out books, one needs to be a member but technically the library opens its door to the public with some areas of the library available to sit and read. The friendly librarians will bring you the books upon request.

The library hosts a variety of writers workshops and educational programs, some for members only but a good amount open to the public as well.  It is a treasure trove for the architecture, history and art buff.

Happy Nesting
XO Tamara
 from 1795-1840 the library was located at 
16 Nassaus street in the spire of Trinity Church.  Early notable folks who utilized the library--  George Washington, John Jay, Herman Melville and Willa Cather.  

Please Read Earnest by Miles Stephenson on Saxon Henry's blog

Please Read Earnest by Miles Stephenson on Saxon Henry's blog
Miles takes us on a journey comparing two favorite writers, Wes Anderson and Ernest Hemingway while retracing Hemingway's haunts in Paris, then a chance meeting with Wes...click photo for story